#ReadYourWorld

mia-pse16

by Mia Ariela Allen

Mia is founder and Director of Professional Learning for Denver-based 4Ed Consulting.  Mia currently is working with school districts nationally and internationally to develop language-rich learning environments.  Mia is also a professional development facilitator and content developer for English Learner Portal.

As English Learner Portal prepares to celebrate Multicultural Children’s Book Day mcbpon January 25th, Mia shares her thoughts on supporting our students with literature.  Hear the other English Learner Portal team members share their favorite multicultural children’s books by visiting https://englishlearnerportal.teachable.com.

 

Reading the world always precedes reading the word, and reading the word implies continually reading the world, Freire & Macedo (1987). Literacy: Reading the word and the world.

Even if your students have not been exposed to all of the recent news stories about or even photos of refugees, they may have heard about the crisis impacting young children and families around the world. Many of our nation’s refugee families, are resettling in communities across the United States. 

When we are talking to our students about the global refugee crisis, it is very important to reinforce your own student’s safety.  The journey that many of our newcomers have had to take was incredibly dangerous. As you consider the students in your class, you will want to first consider these journeys and how to relate the stories about refugees to their experiences.  As our students are able to begin to relate to these journeys to their own sense of safety, it will be important to first help students create their understanding of who a refugee is, where refugees may come from, and what newly arrived refugees might need to feel safe and welcomed in their new communities.

Children’s literature is an excellent way to support difficult discussions and to foster empathy and understanding about the refugee crisis.  These children’s books focus on two central and common themes; the refugee journey to safety and their experiences within the new community. 

imnewhereI’m New Here by Anne Sibley O’Brien

K-1st Grade Selection

This simple story is told through the eyes of three newcomer children; Jin from Korea, Fatima from Somalia, and Maria from Guatemala.  All three children share the struggles of feeling safe, welcome and comfortable in their new American schools.  Each student shares the challenge of communicating in English both in the classroom and on the playground.  This simple and approachable story helps facilitate wonderful classroom discussion on community, collaboration, and caring for one another.

 

colourofhomeThe Colour of Home by Mary Hoffman & Karin Littlewood

1st-2nd Grade Selection

Hassan, a 1st grade student from Somalia talks about feeling homesick in his new community.  Hassan and his family have just recently arrived in the United States after fleeing war and spending time waiting in a refugee camp.  Like many newly resettled refugees, Hassan misses speaking Somali, his home, his community and is struggling to communicate in his new language, English.  Hassan is especially missing his cat, Musa, who he had to leave behind. When Hassan arrives in his new home, he believes he has left all of the colours of his world behind.  This incredibly vivid story helps our students feel empathy and gain a better understanding of some of the experiences a student their age may have overcome to begin a new life in a new community.

steppingstonesStepping Stones- A Refugee Family’s Journey

3rd Grade and Beyond Selection

Our final selection is a beautiful story told by Margaret Ruurs and accompanied by the art of Nizar Ali Badr.  As Ruurs highlights in the forward, the rock painting illustrations were created by Nazir, an artist in Syria.  The l rock illustrations highlight the story, in both English and Arabic, a journey to safety.  Much like the other stories, the newly resettled family is both hopeful and thankful for their new home and community.

 

Additional selections to consider for your classroom library

  • Ada, A.(2002), I Love Saturdays and Domingos
  • (1998). Mariante’s Story: Painted Words & Spoken Memories.
  • Anzalüda, G. (1993).Friends from the Other Side
  • Applegate, K. Home of the Brave.
  • Beckwith, K. Playing War.
  • Bunting, E. (1993) Going Home
  • Burg, A. Serafina’s Promise.
  • Cha, D. Dia’s Story Cloth: The Hmong People’s Journey to Freedom
  • Choi, Y. (2001). The Name Jar
  • Cohen, S. Mai Ya’ Long Journey.
  • Danticat, E. Mama’s Nightingale: A story of immigration and separation.
  • Deitz-Shea, P. The Whispering Cloth
  • Del Rizzo, S. My Beautiful Birds
  • DePrince, M. Taking Flight: From War Orphanto Star Ballerina.
  • Duncan, D.
  • Flores-Galbis, E. 90 Miles to Havana
  • Garza, C.L. (1996). In My Family: En mi familia.
  • Gillick, M. Once they had a country: Two Teenage Refugees in the Second World War
  • Gutiérrez, R. K’naan.
  • Hampton, M. The Cat of Kosovo
  • Hoffman, M. The Color of Home
  • Jimenez, F. (2001). Breaking Through
  • Jimenez, F. (1997a) The Circuit: Stories from the Life of a Migrant Child
  • Kuntz, D. Lost and Found Cat: The True Story of Kunkush’s Incredible Journey
  • Lai, T. Inside Out and Back Again.
  • Laure Bondoux, A. A Time of Miracles
  • Lofthouse, L. Ziba Came on a Boat.
  • Lord, M. A Song for Cambodia
  • Martinez, V. (1996) Parrot in the Oven: Mi Vida.
  • Mead, A Girls of Kosovo
  • McCarney, R. Where will I live.
  • Mikaelsen, B. Red Midnight.
  • Palacios, A. (1997). One City, One School, Many Foods.
  • Park, F. My Freedom Trip.
  • Paulsen, (1995). La tortelleria
  • Pinkey, A. The Red Pencil.
  • Ruurs, M. Stepping Stones: A Refugee Family’s Journey (Arabic & English Edition)
  • Sanna, F. The Journey.
  • Simon, R. Oskar and the Eight Blessings.
  • Smith Milway, K. The Banana-Leaf Ball: How Play Can Change the World
  • Soto, G. (1997). Buried Onions
  • John, W. Outcasts United: The Story of a Refugee Soccer Team That Changed a Town
  • Tsang, N. (2003) Rice All Day
  • Young, R.
  • Wild, M. The Treasure Box.
  • Wilkes, S. Out of Iraq: Refugees’ Stories in Words, Paintings and Music.
  • Williams, M. Brothers in Hope: The Story of the Lost Boys of Sudan
  • Williams, K. Four Feet, Two Sandals.
  • Woodruff, E. The Memory Coat.

 

Do you have a favorite multicultural children’s book you’d like to share in our online collection?  Make a video of you sharing your favorite and reasons why and send it to info@englishlearnerportal.com.  We’d love to have you!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you aren’t already part of our mailing list, please sign up HERE to receive freebies, announcements, and just to get to know us!  Looking for new ideas and graduate credits? Visit our Online Professional Development School!  Please visit the ELP website to meet the team and learn more about our services.

 

Writing with English learners: Why plagiarism is serious business

frank

Frank Bonkowski is an educational writer, English language teacher, and e-learning specialist, passionate about learning and teaching. As a lover of writing, Frank has a twofold mission: to teach English learners to write better and to train language teachers in teaching effective academic writing. He was a teacher trainer at several universities, including McGill, Concordia, and TELUQ, a center of distance education.  We are thrilled to have Frank as a member of our online course community at English Learner Portal.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

In today’s post, let’s look at ways you can help learners avoid plagiarism. The text is based on a lecture in Module 3 of my three-credit graduate course in teaching writing.

Why plagiarism is serious business

cartoongirlcomputerIn this lecture, we tackle the serious problem of plagiarism. If a learner is caught plagiarizing, it can have serious consequences.

At college or university level, the least serious penalty could be getting a zero grade on an assignment; a more serious penalty would be failing the course altogether. The most serious penalty would be getting thrown out of the school.

Learners need to be able to properly paraphrase, summarize, and quote the ideas of others when doing research. In doing these things learners avoid plagiarism.

In this lecture, we’ll first look at who is guilty of plagiarism. Then, we’ll review two strategies for helping learners avoid plagiarism: taking notes and paraphrasing.

Who is guilty of plagiarism?

Ask learners if they have ever taken parts of someone’s writing without citing the source.

Ask learners if they have ever used quotations without giving credit.

Inexperienced writers make these mistakes. It’s easy, simple to do, and seems harmless. If learners haven’t mastered the intricacies of English, it may be tempting to plagiarize. This is true for both native and non-native speakers of English alike.

Plagiarism, also called “cyberplagiarism” by McWhorter, has increased dramatically with cartoonlightbulbthe widespread use of the Internet (Successful 592).

It can take 3 different forms:

  1. a) “borrowing” information from online sources without acknowledging it,
  2. b) cutting and pasting material directly without citing the source,
  3. c) buying essays or papers online and using them as your own work.

Copying the ideas of others is not new. Two thousand years ago, the Roman poet Martial complained about others stealing his poetry.

Plagiarism is not just a violation of another’s writing. it’s also harmful to creators of music, videos, and graphics. For example, here is an interesting anecdote.

Songwriters sometimes commit plagiarism and may get heavy fines if found guilty. In 2014, the Marvin Gaye family was awarded a whopping $ 7.3 million for copyright infringement of a 1977 Gaye song by another singer.

Any way you look at it, plagiarism is theft—the stealing of somebody else’s ideas. Plagiarism is just dumb.

So how can writers avoid plagiarism or be more conscious of it?

The answer is simple. They can learn and practice how to take notes and to paraphrase.

Tip #1 for avoiding plagiarism: Take Notes

nocountryforoldmenLearners need to get into the habit of reading carefully and taking good notes.

Here is a student example using the two-column method (which I explain in another lecture of the online course) presented in an academic English classroom course I teach. The student had to take notes using an online film review.

Film: “No Country for Old Men”

Keyword and questions

  • Unpredictable narrative
  • Breathtaking
  • Sanguinary film
  • Remarkably
  • Sharpest
Notes (key ideas and facts) A modern movie
“Remains remarkably grounded in the everyday”
“Sharpest Coen Bros. film in years”
“Excruciating violence to ratchet up the tension”
“Shocks ’round every plot twist”
Summary:

Review by Bob Mondello , art critic: A really great movie and even the best Coen’s Brothers film in a while.

The movie has a surprising narration and is remarkably authentic and realistic.

The violence keeps the tension high and shocks viewers at every turn in the plot.

Tip #2 for avoiding plagiarism: paraphrase

Paraphrasing is a restatement of an original text in the writer’s own words. It could be a restatement of an entire sentence, part of a sentence, or one or more paragraphs, written in about the same length as the original.

It shows that a writer understands clearly the meaning of the original text. Paraphrasing is a useful way for all writers, but particularly non-native speakers of English, to improve their writing skills.

Here is a useful 10-point paraphrasing checklist you can share with your students.

checklist

Sources:

Douglas, Scott Roy. Academic Inquiry: Writing for Post-secondary Success. Don Mills: Oxford UP, 2014. Print.

McWhorter, Kathleen T. Successful College Writing: Skills, Strategies, Learning Styles. 5th ed. Boston: Bedford St. Martin’s, 2009. Print.​

Williams, Julia. “Unit 4: Art History.” Academic Connections 4. White Plains: Pearson Education, 2010. 75+. Print.

For more helpful teaching tips, enroll now in Teaching Writing to Intermediate and Advanced English Language Learners and earn 3 university credits.

In the next blog post, we will take a look at the SQ3R method based on a lecture in Module 4 of the writing course.

JOIN me on June 28 for a 2-hour online writing workshop

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you aren’t already part of our mailing list, please sign up HERE to receive freebies, announcements, and just to get to know us!  Looking for new ideas and graduate credits? Visit our Online Professional Development School!  Please visit the ELP website to meet the team and learn more about our services.